There can be no doubt that Marxism is on the move in the United States. Those who have been paying attention to history understand that its introduction into our culture started at the turn of the 20th Century and has encroached into our society incrementally ever since.

When the Framers created the Republic – through the codification of the US Constitution and soon after the Bill of Rights, they understood that the documents were created to put the newly created government on notice that it had limitations and boundaries; that it was not the lord of the people, rather the people were the lords of government.

To that end, the tenets and principles that were codified in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights – among them the rights to free speech, the practice of religion, the redress of government, the right to bear arms, the right to be secure in our persons and possessions, among the other enumerated rights, were assumed to be an omnipresent constant in our society; that we, as a people, lived those rights every second of the day.

But 232 years on, our rights are not so assumed. The federal government has overreached to a point where it is tantamount to despotic and bureaucratic, devoid of true representation of its people.

Under the Wilson administration (coincidentally the exact moment that the influence of the Frankfort School took root in America), we lost a basic protection that was built into our Republic. While the US House of Representatives was meant to be the chamber where the direct representation of the people was executed at the federal level, the US Senate was supposed to be the chamber where each of the 50 states were represented, not the people of those states directly, but the governments of those states specifically.

It was for that fact that US Senators were originally appointed, not elected, by the state legislatures. They were emissaries to the federal government from the states, charged with watching out for the sovereignty of the states they were sent to represent.

In this set-up, the people were represented, the states were represented, and the laws of the land emerging from those two chambers centered on the sovereignty of both the people and the states; the federal government’s Executive Branch tasked with executing those laws with fidelity.

With the 17th Amendment, which allowed for the direct election of senators by the people, the protections afforded the states were eliminated, creating an upper chamber similar to the lower chamber; a second chamber vulnerable to national politics. At that moment the states became subservient to the federal government.

And because the protection for the sovereignty of states no longer exists – given that the US Senate was transformed into an over-glorified US House, the politicization of the whole of the Legislative Branch has been completed, making it easier for well-funded activist groups – like Marxists in all their forms – to advocate for laws that incrementally deteriorate our rights and move the United States to Marxism.

Another constitutional failure that took place initially under the Wilson administration was the bureaucratization of the federal government.

Instead of the Legislative Branch creating accurate, well-written, and complete pieces of legislation, the politicized bodies of that branch started leaving the crafting of the details in legislation to the Executive Branch departments, agencies, and commissions. This practice is detrimental to the country for two reasons.

First, it gives legislative power to the Executive Branch in allowing it to define the parameters of legislation, traversing the Separation of Powers. This in and of itself is unconstitutional. Second, it allows the Executive Branch to act unilaterally upon the states and the people, again, something that is unconstitutional.

This authoritarian cancer – something that our Framers would have gone to war to prevent and/or overthrow, has even crept into the private sector; into whole industries that engage in social engineering behavior that marginalizes the rights of individuals and which attempts to punish state governments. Perfect examples of this come in Major League Baseball’s move out of Georgia for the All-Star Game and the Federal Reserve Bank’s embrace of ESG scoring.

All of this culminates in the facilitation of Marxism’s advancement into our government, into our corporations, and into the full fabric of our society.

The pathway back to constitutionalism rests in the restoration of state sovereignty as it was secured in the original Founding Documents.

State governments that still believe that government serves the people and not the other way around, must engage in two efforts to lead the nation back to health: Nullification

Reducing the pain the federal government is able to inflict upon the states

The federal government can only exact pain on the states through the withholding of federal tax dollars; tax dollars derived, ironically, from the states. Should state governments craft laws that disrupt the extraction of federal tax dollars directly from a state’s citizenry – perhaps making those dollars pass through the state governments for remittance in bulk and at once, the states would have effectively eliminated the federal government’s vehicle for the coercion of the states.

It would be in the aftermath of codifying that legislation – to neuter the ability of the federal government to exact punitive pain against a non-conformist state, that the vehicle of nullification should be fully employed against every unfunded federal mandate and every federal act that is counter to the Bill of Rights and the US Constitution.

Acknowledging that the people of the United States exist in a constant state of Rights is integral to empowering the state governments to stand up to the tyranny of the minority in what is the federal government.

It will be a long road, but with governors like Ron DeSantis of Florida, Greg Abbott of Texas, Kristi Noem of South Dakota, and a few others, there is hope for the leaders of the 50 sovereign states to counter the embrace of Marxism that currently holds our federal government hostage.